Getting more green: Smart allocation of restoration funds

Since European settlement, more than a quarter of Australia’s native forest and woodlands have been cleared and scientists say vegetation restoration is urgently needed to avoid further loss of species and ecosystem services.

To help ensure that tax-payer money is spent cost-effectively, efficiently, and transparently in restoration projects, scientists from The University of Queensland and the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions have developed a decision support tool that delivers a ‘cost-effective roadmap’ for investment in land restoration.

Project leader Dr Luke Shoo said the approach considers much more than just planting trees.

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Making the most of limited conservation funds

One of the balancing acts faced by conservation agencies is how to conserve and protect as many species as possible from extinction with limited funding and finite resources. In the U.S., conservation agencies are supported and guided by the Endangered Species Act, the seminal wildlife conservation tool signed by President Nixon in 1973, but which is currently being reviewed by Congress.

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Do MPAs work for this iconic, threatened seabird?

Seabirds depend on Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) as a safe haven for feeding, especially during their breeding season when adults spend days out at sea foraging to feed their young.

But a new study from CEED has found sites chosen at random would be more effective than the current MPAs managed by the Commonwealth Government for protecting one of Australia’s most iconic, threatened seabirds - the endemic Shy Albatross.

Read more: Do MPAs work for this iconic, threatened seabird?

A cautionary tale for conservation policy

Agricultural expansion is the most well-known driver of deforestation and it is estimated to account for roughly 80% of global deforestation.

Despite a wealth of case studies, few general conclusions can be made regarding the causes of deforestation as the drivers often occur in complex feedbacks and operate at different scales.

Read more: A cautionary tale for conservation policy

Accounting for the cost of conservation is necessary to help save species

A lack of accurate and consistent estimates of the cost of conservation interventions has been hindering conservation decisions, both at local and international scales. 

A team of leading researchers has taken action towards resolving this problem to improve conservation practice and help save species.


Accounting for the cost of conservation is necessary to help save species

Who’s ready for climate change? You can Google that…

What do you do if you have a question? You probably ‘Google it’.

Now a team of researchers at The University of Queensland is using the big data produced from Google search histories to gauge how ready countries are for the impacts of climate change.

PhD candidate Carla Archibald, from the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, said the researchers used the information to assess general awareness of climate change.

Read more: Who’s ready for climate change? You can Google that…